H.R.G – The Sportsman’s Ideal

Price: £35.00

ISBN: #978-0956512406

The Michael Sedgwick Memorial Trust supported the original edition of this book, which was published by Motor Racing Publications in 1985. The Trust are delighted to support this revised and expanded edition incorporating the results of a further 35 years of research by Ian Dussek, a long-time HRG owner and leading light in the HRG Association. This comprehensive tome contains the complete history of the Marque.

HRG Engineering Company also known as HRG, was a British car manufacturer based in Tolworth, Surrey. Founded in 1936 by Major Edward Halford, Guy Robins and Henry Ronald Godfrey, its name was created from the first letter of their surnames. Cars were produced under the HRG name from 1935 to 1956.Having raced together at Brooklands, Ron Godfrey approached Major Edward Halford in 1935 as regards the development of a new sports car. Having shown the prototype in late 1935, the company was formed in 1936 with Guy Robins formerly of Trojan joining as the third partner.
Taking space at the premises of the Mid-Surrey Gear Company in Hampden Road, Norbiton, the cars were heavily influenced in their design by Godfrey's previous long involvement — from 1909 — with both the GN company and subsequently Frazer Nash.
The first Meadows-engined HRG cost £395, about half the cost of the 1.5-litre Aston Martin, and weighed almost 1000 pounds (450 kg) less.
Singer engines and gearboxes.
In 1938 the Company announced the 1100cc model [with a shorter wheelbase] using an OHC engine from Singer's Bantam Nine. and then in 1939 they also started using the OHC 1500cc Singer Twelve later Singer Roadster engine in place of the old OHV Meadows unit.
Post-war, the 1100 and 1500 2-seaters continued being made to the same pre-war design. HRG also commenced manufacturing the Aerodynamic model on basically the same vintage chassis.
In 1950 Guy Robins left the company and S. R. Proctor joined as technical director, having been associated with Godfrey on the ill-fated Godfrey-Proctor in the 1920s. Sports car production ended in 1956 after 241 cars had been made, although the company remained in business as an engineering concern and as a development organisation for others, including Volvo. In 1965, they made a prototype Vauxhall VX 4/90-powered sports car. The company ceased trading in 1966, making a profit until the end.

Published 2010

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